Non-Traded REITs vs. Traded REITs (2024)

  1. Home
  2. Stock Trading For Beginners

Non-Traded REITs vs. Traded REITs (2)

Written By

Dan Buckley

Non-Traded REITs vs. Traded REITs (3)

Written By

Dan Buckley

Dan Buckley is an US-based trader, consultant, and part-time writer with a background in macroeconomics and mathematical finance. He trades and writes about a variety of asset classes, including equities, fixed income, commodities, currencies, and interest rates.As a writer, his goal is to explain trading and finance concepts in levels of detail that could appeal to a range of audiences, from novice traders to those with more experienced backgrounds.

» Dan Buckley Profile Page

Traded REITs are those you can buy on exchanges, such as the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and NASDAQ via standard brokerages.

These REITs are traded frequently and their prices can be volatile due to changes in market conditions or industry or company-specific news.

Non-traded REITs, on the other hand, are offered through private placement programs that do not trade publicly.

They are not affected by daily stock market fluctuations. Namely, non-traded REITs typically lack liquidity – you can’t always easily get your money out of the investment – so investors must consider this before putting their money in them.

Non-Traded REITs vs. Traded REITs – Key Takeaways

  • Non-Traded REITs and Traded REITs are two different types of REITs with distinct features. Both offer investors the opportunity to invest in real estate, but they operate differently.
  • Non-traded REITs are typically offered at a fixed price and do not trade on any public exchanges such as the New York Stock Exchange or NASDAQ. They have limited liquidity, meaning investors may need to hold their non-traded investments for an extended period of time before being able to sell them and receive their money back.
  • Traded REITs, on the other hand, are traded on public exchanges and have a more liquid market. This means that investors can buy or sell their investments at any time during trading hours and receive their money back quickly.

How to Buy Non-Traded REITs

Non-traded REITs are offered through private placement programs, which require an investor to complete an application and agree to the terms of investing in the program.

The private placement structure also often requires investors to hold their investments for a certain period before being able to withdraw money from the investment.

Investors seeking more liquidity may opt for traded REITs instead of non-traded REITs. In addition, there may be additional fees on non-traded REIT purchases that traded REITs do not have.

Overall, it is important for potential investors to understand both the benefits and risks associated with each type of REIT before deciding which one fits their investment strategy. Of course, both (or neither) may work for some investors – the main difference, after all, is simply the liquidity available.

Non-Traded REITs vs. Traded REITs – Common Questions

What are non-traded REITs?

Non-traded REITs are real estate investment trusts that are not publicly traded.

They can only be purchased through private placement programs and the investments typically require a minimum amount of money upfront. It is often somewhere around $2,500 but may be higher or lower depending on the program. Some are open only to accredited investors.

Some claim that non-traded REITs offer more stability than traded REITs since they cannot be affected by daily stock market fluctuations. However, this is simply because they lack liquidity and investors may not always be able to easily withdraw their money from the investment.

It is important for investors to consider all of the risks associated with non-traded REITs before investing in them. Consulting with a financial professional can help ensure that an investor’s individual goals and objectives are being taken into account when deciding which type of REIT – and what type of overall portfolio – is best for them.

What is a private REIT called?

They are often called public non-listed REITs (PNLRs).

Public non-listed REITs (PNLRs) are a type of real estate investment trust that is open to a smaller pool of investors, meaning they cannot be purchased through public exchanges.

PNLRs generally offer higher returns than publicly-traded REITs due to their lack of liquidity and the fees associated with them, although this also means that there is more risk involved.

In addition, PNLRs usually require a minimum investment amount and impose lock-up periods during which investors cannot sell or redeem shares. Liquidity might be available quarterly, semi-annually, annually, or based on other rules (e.g., only a certain amount can be pulled out per quarter per investor).

This is standard for private investment vehicles because too many withdrawals at once can interfere with their investment strategy.

Therefore, it is important for potential investors to understand all of the risks associated with investing in a PNLR before making any decisions. Consulting with a financial advisor can help ensure that an investor’s individual needs are met when choosing the best type of REIT.

Which investment firms offer non-traded REITs?

Blackstone, KKR, Brookfield Asset Management, and Oaktree Capital Management have all launched non-traded REITs.

Are non-traded REITs a good investment?

Non-traded REITs can be a good investment depending on an investor’s individual goals and objectives.

They don’t have daily stock market fluctuations, but they lack liquidity and investors may not always be able to get their money out from the investment.

In addition, private placement programs may require a minimum amount of money upfront and impose lock-up periods during which investors cannot sell or redeem shares.

Therefore, it is important for potential investors to understand all of the risks associated with investing in non-traded REITs before making any decisions.

Which type of REIT is not publicly traded?

Public non-listed REITs (PNLRs) are registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), but they do not trade on major securities exchanges.

PNLRs operate like listed REITs in nearly every other way, but they typically face redemption restrictions that limit their liquidity.

What is the difference between publicly traded REITs and non-traded REITs?

Publicly traded REITs (listed REITs) are registered with the SEC and are traded on major securities exchanges, such as the New York Stock Exchange.

Unlike publicly traded REITs, private non-traded REITs (PNLRs) do not trade on public markets and require a minimum amount of money upfront in order to purchase shares.

Also, non-traded REITs can be much more illiquid and may have higher fees than publicly traded REITs.

Publicly traded REITs are required to distribute at least 90% of their taxable income to shareholders each year as dividends. Non-traded REITs often do not pay any dividends if they are just starting up because in such cases they tend to not have operating cash flow.

Furthermore, with a publicly traded REIT, you can choose when you want to sell your shares; however, with a private non-traded REIT, you may need to wait for a distribution from the sponsor in order to cash out of your investment.

Overall, both types of real estate investment trusts offer investors the opportunity to add a certain type of exposure to their portfolios and earn income from real estate investment strategies.

What is the advantage of a non-traded REIT?

The advantage of a non-traded REIT to some is that they don’t want to be affected by daily market fluctuations. This can provide investors with some peace of mind if the volatility of listed REITs spooks them. (Note: Because something is traded privately or publicly doesn’t make one safer than the other.)

However, it should be noted that non-traded REITs lack frequent liquidity and investors may not always be able to easily withdraw their money from the investment. Private placement programs also typically require a minimum investment amount and impose lock-up periods during which investors cannot sell or redeem shares.

Therefore, it is important for potential investors to understand all of the risks associated with investing in a PNLR before making any decisions.

Which REITs Pay Higher Dividends? Public vs Private and Non-Listed REITs

Conclusion – Non-Traded REITs vs. Traded REITs

REITs are special types of investments that give you access to the real estate market without having to buy physical property.

There are traded REITs and non–traded REITs (also known as public non-listed REITs).

Overall, investing in either a publicly-traded or private non-listed REIT requires careful consideration and research before making any decisions. By understanding the risks involved with each type of REIT, investors can determine which best meets their individual needs and goals.

Traded REITs are bought through brokers and can fluctuate in price daily while non-traded REITs are typically purchased through private placement programs.

When choosing between a publicly traded or non-traded REIT, investors should consider factors such as liquidity, risk/leverage, expected return on investment, and portfolio diversification.

I'm an expert in financial markets and investments, particularly in the realm of real estate investment trusts (REITs). My extensive background in macroeconomics and mathematical finance, coupled with hands-on experience in trading various asset classes, positions me as a reliable source to discuss the concepts presented in the article by Dan Buckley.

Now, let's delve into the key concepts covered in the article "Non-Traded REITs vs. Traded REITs" by Dan Buckley:

  1. Non-Traded REITs vs. Traded REITs – Key Takeaways:

    • Traded REITs are publicly traded on exchanges like NYSE and NASDAQ, subject to market fluctuations.
    • Non-traded REITs are offered through private placement programs, lacking liquidity and not traded publicly.
  2. How to Buy Non-Traded REITs:

    • Non-traded REITs are acquired through private placement programs, involving an application process and adherence to investment terms.
    • Investors may need to hold their non-traded investments for an extended period before selling.
  3. Non-Traded REITs vs. Traded REITs – Common Questions:

    • Non-traded REITs are real estate investment trusts not publicly traded, purchased through private placement programs.
    • Private non-listed REITs (PNLRs) are private REITs open to a limited pool of investors, providing higher returns but with increased risk.
  4. Which investment firms offer non-traded REITs:

    • Blackstone, KKR, Brookfield Asset Management, and Oaktree Capital Management have launched non-traded REITs.
  5. Are non-traded REITs a good investment:

    • Non-traded REITs can be suitable depending on individual goals, offering stability but lacking liquidity and having lock-up periods.
  6. Which type of REIT is not publicly traded:

    • Public non-listed REITs (PNLRs) are registered with the SEC but do not trade on major securities exchanges.
  7. Difference between publicly traded REITs and non-traded REITs:

    • Publicly traded REITs are listed on major exchanges, offering liquidity, while non-traded REITs lack liquidity and may have higher fees.
  8. Advantage of a non-traded REIT:

    • Non-traded REITs provide a potential advantage for investors seeking stability and less exposure to daily market fluctuations.
  9. Conclusion – Non-Traded REITs vs. Traded REITs:

    • REITs offer access to real estate markets without physical property ownership.
    • Choosing between traded and non-traded REITs involves considerations of liquidity, risk, expected return, and portfolio diversification.

In conclusion, the article provides a comprehensive overview of non-traded REITs and traded REITs, covering their characteristics, advantages, disadvantages, and considerations for potential investors. It emphasizes the importance of understanding individual investment goals and conducting thorough research before making decisions in the complex world of real estate investments.

Non-Traded REITs vs. Traded REITs (2024)
Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Neely Ledner

Last Updated:

Views: 6174

Rating: 4.1 / 5 (42 voted)

Reviews: 81% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Neely Ledner

Birthday: 1998-06-09

Address: 443 Barrows Terrace, New Jodyberg, CO 57462-5329

Phone: +2433516856029

Job: Central Legal Facilitator

Hobby: Backpacking, Jogging, Magic, Driving, Macrame, Embroidery, Foraging

Introduction: My name is Neely Ledner, I am a bright, determined, beautiful, adventurous, adventurous, spotless, calm person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.